March down to the sea… and the Crocs!

On the spur of the moment (but the seed was planted a little while ago) we decided to take a break and take the boys to the seaside and combine it with a visit to Crocworld, about two hours’ drive away.  Why Crocworld? Mr.A are CRAZY about reptiles at the moment: dinosaurs, dragons, snakes, crocodiles, turtles, lizards… with Dinosaurs and Dragons an all time favourite and crocodiles quickly taking up the third favourite position. Crocworld had not just crocodiles and snakes, but also some birds and farm animals, thus catering more to the whole family ;) and not just reptile lovers.

All things sea and sand

As it was raining for most of our visit (typical), we only got to the beach on two occasions, but we made the most of both. They have been to the beach before, but unfortunately it was quick “drop-ins” with no time to sit and play. So their first visit this time round ended up in them splashing in the high tide waves rolling out on the beach (no photos – too wet!) They had quickly met and made friends with various kids at the resort we were staying and the group of kids had a ball on the beach with us parents keeping an eagle-eye lookout!

On the second visit to the beach the boys and I had it mostly for ourselves, as the day started out overcast and not at all inviting. But it suited us 100%

First cautious "inspection"

First cautious “inspection”

They quickly decided to play amongst the rocks rather than in the sand, as we have a rather large sand play area at home, which especially Mr.R often plays in.

Mr.R exploring.

Mr.R exploring.

Mr.A exploring more cautiously.

Mr.A exploring more cautiously.

Within an hour the clouds started rolling away and the sun extended not-too-hot rays out our way:

Mr.A posing as strong-sea-man.

Mr.A posing as strong-sea-man.

Mr.R inspecting the "rock pool".

Mr.R inspecting the “rock pool”.

Trees were made for playing.

Trees were made for playing.

Trees were made for playing... and to enjoy the view.

Trees were made for playing… and to enjoy the view.

Those days that were spent at the resort were also “wet-wet-wet” action: the speed slide was an immediate favourite and at first when courage lacked, they did it together. After that I had to raise the “mommy-voice” often to remind them to be cautious! In the end there were no injuries and they had made a bunch of friends, of whom one family also turned out to be home-schoolers!

Speed slide.

Speed slide.

Calmer activities like putt-putt (miniature golf) where also tried, as well as table tennis (which is still a bit out of their league). And if you can’t decide how to hold the putter for putt-putt and become frustrated, then you light the way for your family, all around the course.

Statue of Liberty lights the way.

Statue of Liberty lights the way.

They have seen the Statue of Liberty in various of their favourite movies, thus it has become a well-known favourite with them.

All things Reptilian

On our last day the skies cleared and we had a beautiful sunshine day ahead of us. We took off early for Crocworld (view some of their videos here), and the promised day among all things reptilian. Mr.A was SO excited he could hardly keep it in. We were regaled with many, many informational tidbits about reptiles, more specifically crocodiles (glad the dino’s and dragons are laid to rest for the moment!).

The staff was amazing. On arrival they immediately recognised eager anticipation in his eyes and organised that we visit the baby crocs after the standard “feeding talk” that are held at 11h00 every day. As luck would have it (for us, not the victim), a baby Sacred Ibis fell out of a tree in one of the crocodile areas (they have four different types of crocodiles), and became instant croc-food. We watched in shocked fascination as those giant jaws locked around the baby bird (almost full-grown, but couldn’t yet fly) and how it went about drowning it, then later on breaking bigger bones to be able to swallow this unexpected meal.

One of these babies became lunch.

One of these babies became lunch.

At this stage my camera’s battery ran flat, so I had to revert to taking cellphone photos for the croc-talk.

Mr.A drank in as much of the guide’s talk as he could understand and take in, while Mr.R (not such a reptile fan) kept an eye on the exact location of the restaurant for his promised milkshake and chips. As soon as the talk finished, he took off straight for the deck, and patiently waited there (always within sight) for us to join him at a more leisurely pace. This isn’t something I normally allow, but as I knew he wouldn’t stop and do something stupid like try to touch a crocodile, and knew he was perfectly safe there on the deck of the restaurant, I let it slide. He did however get a warning about safety as soon as we joined him. But this almost 5-year-old boy had taken the initiative and ordered chips and milkshakes for both himself and his brother, keeping a table for us as family and just relaxing there all by himself.

clockwise, top left: US alligator close-up; Nile croc open jaws; Nile croc; chicken feed

clockwise, top left: US alligator close-up; Nile croc open jaws; Nile croc; chicken feed

Oh! Did you know that crocodiles don’t have tongues?

After lunch we visited the baby Nile crocodiles. Upon entering the room, the guide told us to stand dead still, as one of the babies had climbed out of the walled enclosure and he first wanted to pick it up, before it escaped out the door! Yes, crocodiles can climb up trees (and brick walls), especially when younger and nimbler, but even older (wild) crocodiles had been spotted IN trees, that were at an incline, looking for prey, or maybe just trying to reach a sunny spot (?!)

Eagerness changing into uncertainty about holding a real live baby nile.

Eagerness changing into uncertainty about holding a real live baby Nile.

If my big brother can do it, so can I, with Mr.A cautioning in the back ground.

If my big brother can do it, so can I, with Mr.A cautioning in the back ground.

Really touching and feeling the difference in skin texture (back vs. tummy).

Really touching and feeling the difference in skin texture (back vs. tummy).

Did you know that a crocodile can shed teeth up to 50 times in their life time? As they grow they lose the smaller teeth to be replaced by bigger ones! They do not chew, but swallow their food whole, that is why they often shake and hit the food on the water or rocks to break the bones and make it more “swallow-able”. They also have a sort of “kitchen” area under the water where bigger, tougher pieces of meat can rot away to become softer and more manageable to swallow.

We also had a walk around their snake exhibits, as well as looking in on the tortoises, and the very nimble Nile Monitor Lizard (likkewaan).

Some of the older inhabitants.

One of the older inhabitants.

This guy was super fast and not at all happy with humans around his enclosure, so we left him alone.

This guy was super fast and not at all happy with humans around his enclosure, so we left him alone.

Snake skin.

Snake skin.

Mr. Snake, where are you?

Mr. Snake, where are you?

Bull frog (no not a reptile).

Bull frog (no not a reptile).

But Crocworld are not just about scales and sharp teeth, no I had a chance to walk among birds, with one very curious pelican who kept following us inside this walk-in cage. His fellow pelican was a different story – totally camera-shy. There was also Isis the Fish Eagle who could be heard throughout the park, as well as owls and horned bills, and a very small Animal Farm-area with playful goats.

clockwise, top left: Isis the Fish Eagle; pelican; yellow horn-bill; flamingoes

clockwise, top left: Isis the Fish Eagle; pelican; yellow horn-bill; flamingoes

Goats a-climbing!

Goats a-climbing!

One very tired but happy family got back in the car for a lazy, quiet last afternoon at the sea, or at least listening to the sound of the sea from our stoep (patio).

PS: We stayed at Suntide Beach Club, KZN Banana Beach, as part of the RCI holiday exchange programme. I whole-heartedly recommend them for a nice family-like, relaxed stay in either flats, rondavels, or small holiday houses.

Hope you enjoyed sharing our beach holiday and visit to Crocworld.

Chat again soon.

BEAR_logo

Categories: Home Schooling, Home, house, hearth | 1 Comment

Expedition Earth – India

Great excitement filled the air as I handed each boy their passport. Where were we off to? On an imaginary, but still exploratory tour of India!

Tour of India

Namastē

The flight was short and sweet because we had a tour waiting for us: A “Jungle Book” tour of various animals from India.

Story in the background, while we make various Indian animals from our cake decorations book.

Story in the background, while we make various Indian animals from our cake decorations book

Our cake decorations book and our playdough tiger

Our cake decorations book and our play dough tiger

We watched various videos on Indian animals like the tiger, the Indian elephant, as well as the “dancing cobras”.

Clockwise - back to front: cobra, tiger, lizard, elephant

Clockwise – back to front: cobra, tiger, lizard, elephant

I can recommend the following YouTube videos:

There are two main opinions about the Cobra “dances”: one point of view is that it is cruel to the snakes, because they are kept in a dark basket or bag, and then suddenly let out in the light, and that causes them to be “dizzy” or to sway from side-to-side. The other view is that these snakes are acting naturally, but controlled because of being trained by their charmer/owner.

An interesting fact about the Asian Cobra – it is the most poisonous cobra and one snake-bite can kill an Indian elephant!

As the boys found the snake videos very fascinating we made jewelled baskets for our snakes – thank you Hayley (another hs-mom and resident pottery teacher) for the lessons on pinch pots!

Mr.A enjoying himself

Mr.A enjoying himself

Mr.R concentrating very hard on his pinch pot and lid

Mr.R concentrating very hard on his pinch pot and lid

They decided that we can send these pots later as gifts to their grandmothers to keep jewellery in. One for granny C and one for granny B. Something else that we learned about Indian animals – some of them have African “cousins”. Those that interested the boys most were:

  • The Indian Elephant;
  • The Indian One Horned Rhino;
  • The Indian Lion;
  • The River Dolphin;
  • Thresher Sharks (as opposed to various shark species found in our waters);
  • Salt Water Crocodile (we have the Nile Crocodile);
  • And obviously Cobra snakes.

On National Geographic for Kids you can find out more about some of the above animals. Did you know that the peacock comes from India? We didn’t, and the boys love those beautiful tail feathers.

India – History and Interesting Facts

A tour of India are not complete without a visit to the Taj Mahal. There are some interesting controversy about this beautiful, majestic building, which we learned more about in the following video:

And you can make this paper model craft of the Taj Mahal.

Taj Mahal Paper Model Plan

There is also an interesting short video on trains in India, which explains why the greatest train accident happened in that country. And if you are interested in the Himalayas and the Ganges river – and more interesting information about India’s History (includes information about their gods) – you have to watch: Ganges – A complete documentary.

Note: We are Christians, but we explain to the boys that not all people on earth believe the same as we do, therefore I (normally) don’t cut out scenes from other faiths.

Most of India’s people are very poor, and we read in our encyclopedia (Kinders van die Wêreld) about children who couldn’t go to school (or learn at home like us) because they had to earn an income for the family to survive on! We have a similar situation in our country with kids having barely enough to eat everyday. Although some state schools, as well as various organisations, give food hand-outs, we frequently have “guests” at our gate asking for food. The fact that there are people struggling all over the world, gave them pause and food for thought (no pun intended).

Our tour of India took a South African turn with our Indian neighbours across the street sharing some Indian treats with us! The boys were however not used to the spiciness of the sweet treats, but daddy B and I enjoyed it very much! We love Indian curries which you find in almost any grocer or fast food shop.

Indian treats and crafts

Indian treats and crafts

And lastly we had a look at the various glamorous and brightly coloured Indian clothes. Again our neighbours often wear more traditional clothes on their various holidays, and the boys have already had a good look at them, as well as the various adults and kids they frequently see in town.

Indian clothes and a closer look at our handiwork.

Indian clothes and a closer look at our handwork.

This concluded our visit to India. With a contented sigh I greet you -

Agalī bāra jaba taka (Until next time)

BEAR_logo

Categories: Expedition Earth, Home Schooling | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Expedition Earth – China

Great excitement filled the air as I handed each boy their own ‘passport’. Where were we off to? On an imaginery, but still exploratory tour of China!

It took almost an hour for our “plane” to fly and land in China, as it went through all kinds of storms and disasters. I am quite amazed that we landed in one piece as at some point I was told by our “captain” that we were going to have to do an emergency landing in the middle of the ocean! … Yes, the two boys lack no imagination.

Tour of China

As we landed I changed from passenger to passport security, and made sure that our China country flag was pasted and we were “checked into” the country.

Where on the map?

Where on the map?

Kinders van die Wêreld ensiklopedie  (Children of the World encyclopedia)

Kinders van die Wêreld ensiklopedie
(Children of the World encyclopedia) next to the passports – checked into the country

The following are part of the programme – already set up in Expedition Earth:

  • Find the country on a world map and pin (we used the round flag circles that is part of Christmas around the World unit);
  • Read the Fun Facts for the country (in parent guide);
  • How to greet and say thank you in the language of the country (on a little lapbook template, as well as an internet link in the parent guide to follow);
  • How to say and write your name in that language (internet link in guide to translator);
  • Information on the country and its animals (internet link in guide to National Geographic Kids);
  • Learn about the flag and colour it in (page in student guide);
  • Various interesting facts about monuments or other places in the country, and activities to go with what you learn about (parent guide);
  • Make a post card about the country, drawing your favourite thing on the post card;
  • Food from the country (parent guide – not all countries)…
  • Various other reports and activities which I chose to do in the years to come, and not now.

What worked for us?

What worked for us, was less reading – and then mostly from our Kinders van die Wêreld (Children of the World) encyclopedia, but lots of Youtube and National Geographic (were possible) videos on the different topics for the country.

Eating popcorn with chopsticks. They were not impressed with the Chinese Rice.

Eating popcorn with chopsticks.They were not impressed with the Chinese Rice or the Chinese’s favourite dish called “Bird Nest Soup”

I can recommend the following Youtube videos:

Making our own sand-clay to build a wall, the old fashioned way.

Making our own sand-clay to build a wall, the old fashioned way.

We made “bricks” with cornflour, river sand, dried grass, etc. for our Great Wall of China version. As we watched one of the videos Mr.A remarked that he had better build a “newer version of the wall” with their blocks, as we had definitely built the “really old part of the wall” with our home made bricks, if you compare to the image on the computer screen in the last photo.

New Year's Dragons pasted on these Chinese fans.

New Year’s Dragons pasted on these Chinese fans

On National Geographic for Kids:

They especially loved the videos on the Red Panda, the Pangolin (they obviously tried to copy-cat that tongue-catching-ants action!), the Golden Monkeys as well as the Storks from China. Then it dawned on them that one of their favourite animation movies – Kung Fu Panda – were set in old China! They recognised the animals from the story, so obviously we had to watch that dvd again.

Our Chinese collection: the Great Wall, traditional dress, Chinese fans, post card with their favourites, Chinese Dragon picture and "lapbook" page with some info on the country, animals from the country, as well as examples of writing, etc.

Our Chinese collection: the Great Wall, traditional dress, Chinese fans, post card with their favourites, Chinese Dragon picture and “lapbook” page with some info on the country, animals from the country, as well as examples of writing, etc.

Another favourite was looking at pictures of Chinese traditional clothes and then colouring and pasting our pictures on empty tp.rolls. The original idea was to physically “dress” a “tp.roll paper doll” by adding wool for hair, material for clothes, etc. but the boys complained a lot and didn’t want to do that, so we are going to stick to looking at photos, then colouring pictures of traditional clothes and sticking it on empty tp.rolls.

Chinese themed activities:

We “checked out” of the country about 7 days later, and today they excitedly told me about the Chinese house they saw in a computer game they were playing. They still remember how to say “hallo” in Chinese [ni hao] and Mr.R also remembered that the word for Great Wall of China is exactly the same as “house” in Chinese: [chángchéng].

Our next country is India and we eagerly anticipate learning about the cobra snake and their “dance”, as well as Indian elephants and the Taj Mahal. But more about our ‘Tour of India’ in the next post.

Xià cì zàijiàn (See you next time)

BEAR_logo

Categories: Expedition Earth, Home Schooling | 2 Comments

Jan 2014 – Bible – Math – and those Extras

I can’t believe that the first month has come and gone…

More things we have done, programmes we started using (for those interested in what and how we do things ;) ) I still get the question “But what are you doing and how do you do it?” a lot. Most of what we do are based on reading and discussion, and if what we are learning about can be shown with physical things, hands-on activities, or build with blocks, clay, etc. then we do it. Our house is not a sit-still-and-be-quiet place, it is a place where we ask questions, question each other, discuss topics, and most of all try to DO things. Well the boys do, I watch and help a little from the sidelines… with my mug of coffee always by my side :)

Jy Mag Maar Vra Omnibus (Bible)

We started using “Jy Mag Maar Vra” as one of our Bible curricula for the year. I was at first a bit unsure of how to tackle this book, but then decided it was more to introduce Bible topics that they were curious about, than to get them to memorise Bible verses, etc. This way they “get the vibe” and the truth, and they are learning to pray about all those important things. I am combining this with writing for Mr.A as I write a date and heading at the top which Mr.A has to copy-write. Then we have to draw a picture to demonstrate the topic of the short little piece I read.

In the first photo you can see our three books: one for me, one for Mr.A and one for Mr.R. This day’s topic was “Who wrote the Bible?” Yes, I drew the stick men on the right and Mr.A drew the proper men on the top left. On the bottom left you can see Mr.R’s doctor with stethoscope and all! There was no way he accepted that a dr. in those times didn’t have something like a stethoscope, because all the doctors that he has seen had one.

Each lesson consists of a little story you read with a Bible verse at the bottom of the page pertaining to the topic, and then on the right hand page are questions that you have to answer. We do these questions orally, and then we draw our pictures about the topic in our books. This is followed by the short little prayer that comes after the questions.

Short enough to keep their attention, but interesting enough to lead to many, many questions, some not that easy to answer! But that is exactly what this book is about. To answer those not so easy questions.

Jy Mag Maar Vra Omnibus

godsdiens2

Yup, they love it!

I wanted to follow this up with Bybelklub vir Kinders, but decided to leave those topics we haven’t done yet for when we do Mystery of History in a year or two’s time. Mystery of History combines Biblical and Secular History to form “The history of the world from a biblical perspective”, which is what we support and believe.

Other than working from “Jy Mag Maar Vra”, we read from our Children’s Bible once or twice a week, before watching a dvd on the story, if we have one. The other option, if we don’t have a dvd, is Brick Bible. Then we have one morning where we just listen, sing, dance and praise along with our children’s gospel music cd’s.

When a particular story catches their attention, it isn’t funny to see that they either act it out or build a scene with their Duplo blocks and animals to “play” the story out. This helps us all to remember the stories and the lessons learned. Because I now anticipate this reaction I always plan for more than 30 min. for Bible time, so that they have time to follow their imaginations end out.

A Box, some Dice, some Blocks… (Math)

We have decided to first lay their Afrikaans home language foundation properly before doing any subjects in another language. Therefore I had to move my dream of using Life of Fred Math books to the future to first use Math programmes in Afrikaans for the next couple of years. They love the Life of Fred stories.

Luckily the two Afrikaans Math programmes that we have used thus far have extra levels that we can continue with. That is Box-n-Dice and Edupeg. You can have a look at some of our Box-n-Dice work here, in this blog post. I also made each a math worksheet file which we do once a week, with the help of manipulatives.

Seeing and building is understanding

Seeing and building is understanding

Next to, before, on top, behind...

Next to, in front of, on top, behind…

Mark the shorter picture of the two...

Mark the shorter picture of the two…

Which is taller, left or right tower?

Which is taller, left or right tower?

Those Extras…

I bought these Ocarinas from Geelgranaat on Bid or Buy: a blue and a terra-cotta one. Luckily there was a booklet with so that this not-so-musically-talented-mom can learn and then try to teach the boys. Our Jack Russel isn’t very impressed and comes to inspect the noise maker each time we try to practice! I did however manage to play my way through Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star, and currently the boys are learning how to move their fingers over the five holes. I appologise to the musically minded people, if I am using the wrong terminology. At least I am learning something new alongside my boys. Our neighbours can attest to that ;)

ocarinas

We also had our first Chess lesson, which Mr.A was mildly interested in. His whole focus was to get as many of his opponent’s pieces (mine and Mr.R’s) off the board, whether that meant sacrificing his King or not! Eish, boys and war! Although I remember some of my lessons in school, I am following a book specifically written for children to learn and understand the subtlety and strategy behind every move.

skaak

And of course the all time favourite: Swimming!

Both boys can help themselves and are swimming without aid. Mr.A’s teacher is trying to get him ready for our Home Schoolers’ Swimming Gala next weekend, so we will have to wait and see how that turns out.

Mr.R concentrating on breathing and keeping his eyes down, while kicking and pulling

Mr.R concentrating on breathing and keeping his eyes down, while kicking and pulling

Mr. A practising freestyle

Mr. A practising freestyle

Oh and I nearly forgot about Playball! What a ball!

Mr. A is the oldest in the group, but he loves every minute!

Mr. A is the oldest in the group, but he loves every minute!

Mr.A hitting the ball, first swing.

Mr.A hitting the ball, first swing.

Mr.R knocked the ball loose from the string and stick, thus had to hit another ball on the ground and not in the air. Sorry teacher N!

Mr.R knocked the ball loose from the string and stick, thus had to hit another ball on the ground and not in the air.
Sorry teacher N!

Hope you enjoyed reading as much as I enjoyed sharing.

BEAR_logo

Categories: Home Schooling | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Feb 2014 – Expedition Earth

Get ready for an exciting voyage across the world! Come along as we walk on the Great Wall of China, wander through the Amazon Rainforest, and climb the Egyptian Pyramids! Within this curriculum you’ll discover the sights and sounds of 31 countries across the globe. You’ll get hands-on with fun activities, crafts, recipes and more! So grab your passports, and get ready to go! It’s time for Expedition Earth!

Expedition Earth: A Journey Through God’s World

The boys expressed an interest in knowing more about other countries at the end of last year, therefore I decided to start Expedition Earth a little earlier than first anticipated. Luckily I had already bought and downloaded the files from Erica at Confessions of a Homeschooler’s website. I fell head over heels in love with this curriculum, specifically because it has a Christian point of view, but also because it is easily adaptable for different ages and levels, it is very visual with all the internet links and hands-on activities, most everything is pre-planned, and I can use it over and over again with a different point of view: countries, geography vocabulary, eco-systems, more in-depth reports when they are older, etc.

Planning and Preparation

You can use Exp.Earth lessons as is because they are pre-planned by day and there are a minimum of books that you then have to buy extra, but of course, I rarely do that. As my two boys don’t have to learn about the countries in detail, I want to use this as an introduction. I looked at the activities that tend to repeat, and included those that would suite us, as well as days for hands-on activities.

Week 1 and 2 – Creation and Map work

For Creation I used old colouring pages I had which we then decorated. In this post you can see the lapbooks we made about The Creation a year ago.

Some pages we decorated about Creation

Some pages we decorated about Creation

Mr.R remembered the sandpaper cosmos we coloured and made his own rendition with glitter glue.

kaartwerk-kosmos

Map work was a mixture of worksheets from Map It Out workbook from Education.com. It is an older version and currently only available in a different form for logical thinking. We also drew our neighbourhood on a huge poster, and the boys decorated the map. This happened after reading more about maps in a library book, and taking our Lego men and woman for a “walk about town” to learn which is better, left and right, or north, east, south and west.

Library book on mapwork with the Lego people exploring the town.

Library book on map work with the Lego people exploring the town.

A map of our area

A map of our area

Our house is the “large” grey house in-between the green and light blue houses. We filled in the street names and they had to tell me how to walk from one place to another using the map. We marked off the houses of friends, and Mr. R insisted on adding his “Imaginary Zoo World” on the far left hand side, because that is what he wants it to be like.

Duplo blocks for houses, flats, train, bridges, etc.

Duplo blocks for houses, flats, train, bridges, etc.

kaartwerk06

Legends were a blast to deceipher

Legends were a blast to decipher

The following week we re-introduced the World, getting to know the names of the oceans and the continents. The boys each had a World Map to colour and Mr.A insisted on adding black for mountains, blue for rivers and dams, etc. according to the World map I have on our big wall board. I just love the DK First Picture Atlases! Don’t you? The one we were using was again from the library, and an older version at that, but the boys enjoyed it nevertheless.

The World - black mountains, brown dessert, yellow grass, green forests, blue rivers

The World – black mountains, brown desert, yellow grass, green forests, blue rivers and red South Africa!

Mr.R preferred to colour the oceans rather than the continents.

Mr.R preferred to colour the oceans and some rivers/dams rather than the continents, except of course for Africa and South Africa.

We finished this map work lesson by learning about the different “areas” that the world can be “divided” into: the northern hemisphere, the southern hemisphere, the arctic and antarctic circles, the meridian, etc.

A little lapbook booklet that stuck on cardboard in our Exp.Earth file

A little lapbook booklet that we stuck on cardboard in our Exp.Earth file

Arctic, Antarctic, Capricorn, etc.

Arctic, Antarctic, Capricorn, etc.

We also played a tour/mission on DK Become a World Explorer (all three of us took a turn) and especially Mr.R loves going on a world tour (with a little bit of help from mom) to find the boy and give him his parcel. I was once again amazed at how much information they have picked up from animation movies: Big Ben in Cars 2, Panama Canal in Sammy’s Adventures, The Eiffel Tower in Monster in Paris, The Redeemer Statue in Rio de Janeiro from the movie Rio… When they recognise a “monument” from one of their stories they are super eager to learn more about it, and very excited that there is truly such a place/statue in the real world!

Next time, more about China, our first destination.

BEAR_logo

Categories: Expedition Earth, Home Schooling | Tags: , , , | 1 Comment

Blog at WordPress.com. The Adventure Journal Theme.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 146 other followers

%d bloggers like this: